Exercise Archives - Medshield Movement

Start Your Day With This Stretch

Whether you’re actively training, going through recovery or are just feeling stiff, this five-minute morning stretch routine is a great way to loosen up your muscles and get into a calm headspace for the day ahead. 

Find yourself a comfortable carpeted area (or place a towel or mat onto a level surface) for these moves. You can even do these on your bed. The key is to focus on your breath and move with your breath. This allows you to naturally create a sense of calm, which helps to combat stress and anxiety.

1. Reclined Figure 4

Start by lying down on your back and take a few breaths to centre yourself and become present, paying attention to how you feel. Bend your knees, pointing them up towards the ceiling and place your feet on the floor. From here, point your right knee out towards the right and place your right foot on top of your left thigh. Gently place pressure on your right thigh, feeling an opening in the hip. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat on the opposite side. If you want a deeper stretch in the outer hip, loop your hands behind the left thigh and gently pull the legs closer to your chest.

2. Cat & Cow

Turn over and kneel on all fours, with your knees directly below your hips and place your hands on the ground directly below your shoulders. Inhale as you lift your head and drop your belly, sticking out your sitting bones for Cow position. Look up towards the ceiling and feel the opening of your chest. Exhale and bring your chin towards your chest and round your shoulders as you look towards your belly button for Cat position. Press into your hands as you round your back and feel the opening of your shoulder blades. Inhale and repeat with Cow. 

3. Downward Facing Dog

From a kneeling position, lift your hips towards the ceiling, straighten your legs and look towards your thighs. Your body should be in a triangular shape called Downward Facing Dog. Your body might feel stiff at first, so take a minute to bend each knee at a time while straightening the opposite leg, loosening your hamstrings. Thereafter, find stillness in the posture and hold for 10 seconds while focusing on your breathing. This helps to stretch out the lower body, improve posture and stimulate blood flow. 

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Health Benefits of Swimming by Sarah Ferguson

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Health Benefits of Swimming by Sarah Ferguson

Health Benefits of Swimming

– by Sarah Ferguson, Breathe Founder & Guinness World Record Holder

I grew up being drawn to water. There is an allure to it that keeps me coming back for more. Some people say that I must have been a mermaid in my past life. Besides my passion for water and being suspended in weightlessness for extended periods, there are a myriad of health benefits that come with swimming.

I could spout the science which can easily be Googled, but I would rather opt to share my personal experiences of the health benefits of swimming as a professional swimmer and a physiotherapist.

For me, the number one benefit of swimming is relaxation.  ‘Never regret a swim’ is one of my mottos. No matter how cold air temperatures are, I have never exited the water regretting it. Even though climbing into the pool is sometimes difficult when the weather is freezing, there’s always an overriding internal voice that reminds me of how good I’m going to feel after a swim.

Swimming is one of the few workouts that make use of all the major muscle groups in the body. You just have to look at Olympic Games swimmers to see how beautifully toned their bodies are. All of your body works in symmetry to push through the water, which acts as extra-gentle resistance that air cannot provide. Swimming works your cardiovascular system aerobically and anaerobically (especially if you add some breath-hold training in) and it improves lung capacity. Many swimmers, even some Olympic Games athletes started swimming to assist with managing their asthma conditions.

Swimming has a low impact on the body, which is hugely beneficial for people suffering from lower back pain or joint issues, as well as hypermobile people like me. Being hypermobile gives you extra flexibility which when combined with strength makes for good swimmers. Cases of injury in swimming are few and far between. Those I do see are generally from overexertion and poor technique.

When I swim it allows me to be completely present in what I am doing and disassociate from the world like nothing else. You cannot talk to your mate on social media or chat apps while you swim, so having your face submerged in the aquatic world is meditative and hypnotic. For example, swimming the Molokai Channel in Hawaii in silvery moonlight with inky darkness below has got to be one of my highlights. It’s completely magical. Offshore swimming for hours on end while watching the dancing rays of light penetrate the water way below me is completely mesmerising. One gets lost in time and space.

The act of diaphragmatic inhalation and exhalation while swimming increases oxygen and blood flow through the body and assists in this meditative state. There are no distractions other than the sound of bubbles and if you are in open water, potentially the privilege of encountering some form of marine life.

Body awareness is key to being a competent swimmer as you have to time the coordination of arms and legs with your breathing. On a day-to-day basis most people never really draw attention to their breath. Studies have shown that most people don’t even breathe correctly. E.g. never engaging the diaphragm to draw breath in. Some benefits of this practice range from reduced anxiety to lower blood pressure.

Swimming is great therapy for kids with attention difficulties or coordination issues, as well as scoliosis as it helps to create balance, alignment, control and improved coordination.

Those who have the luxury of outdoor swimming pools have the added benefit of vitamin D from exposure to the sun. Ocean swimming generates natural ozone which comes with a multitude of added benefits. The rapid growth of cold water swimming can be directly attributed to its great benefits. Some of which include a boosted immune system and improved mood.

The benefits of swimming are paramount. Now get yourself a swimsuit,  dive into the water and see for yourself what swimming can do for you. You won’t regret it!

 

 

 

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Why Training In Winter Makes You a Stronger, Better Athlete

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Why Training In Winter Makes You a Stronger, Better Athlete

Winter is here and it’s getting harder to climb out from beneath the blankets and duvets to get a morning workout in. But come spring, we don’t want to have lost all the fitness gains we triumphantly achieved during warmer months of the year. Winter training will make you a stronger athlete – here’s why!

“In winter, we lose our motivation and drive and it’s not because we don’t want to train, it’s due to our minds wanting to be ‘comfortable/happy’ and wanting to stay in a warm environment,” says running coach, Garth Dorman.

“You have to find the inner strength that challenges the voice that says: ‘the weather is bad, it’s cold, it’s dark, it’s much better to stay inside’. You need to change that voice and say to yourself: ‘life is short, don’t waste time procrastinating’,” explains Garth. “This helps you to make training a permanent feature all year round,” he says.

Studies also show that regular exposure to low temperatures helps our bodies become leaner and fitter. Our bodies learn to make better use of fat reserves and burn excess fat intake faster.

How Winter Training Improves Athletic Performance

In winter you train your mind: “Winter training is more about developing mental strength. You build the mental strength to do tough things and show yourself that you can do them – even if the conditions are challenging,” says Garth. “It’s about developing your mind and training your mind to be stronger.”

Winter training improves your cardio: Cold weather forces your body to work harder during training. This also applies to your cardiovascular system. As the heart works harder to pump blood around the body during cold weather exercises, this invigorating workout helps to boost cardio strength.

Cold-weather training may improve VO2 Max: Colder temperatures cause your body to continue making subtle adaptations, such as your heart and lungs working harder. This helps to improve your muscles’ aerobic function, meaning they receive more oxygen during exercise. Studies have shown that training in the cold can increase your VO2 max; the maximum rate of oxygen your body can use during exercise.

How to Survive the Cold

  1. Layer up! Use layers of clothing that you can easily take off or wrap around your waist as your body warms up during exercise.
  2. Try running gloves and use buffs or caps to ward off the icy feeling on your hands, neck and ears.
  3. Warm-up well! A warm-up routine can prove even more beneficial in cold weather. Your body needs to get used to the low temperature and boost circulation before heading out.
  4. Get warm again quickly – pack jackets to leave in the car or make sure you get into a hot shower quickly to thaw out.
  5. Stay hydrated. You might not feel like drinking as much water as you do in summer, but you still need it and will still lose a lot of fluids while training.

 

 

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Getting Fit In Your 40s with Rugby Legend Stefan Terblanche

If you’ve missed the boat on exercise as a younger person, don’t worry. It’s never too late to start. You may not be able to beat the clock, but you do have some say in how ageing affects your body or how much muscle you can add. With the right plan and guidance, you’ll be able to stay motivated and get in shape and reap the health and lifestyle benefits of good physical fitness.

Medshield recently sat down to talk fitness after 40 with former South African Springbok rugby player and living legend Stefan Terblanche. In our interview, he shares wisdom on how a cookie-cutter approach to fitness is ineffective and how getting in shape and eating for your age will help find you on the right side of 40.

Q: Thank you for joining us, Stefan. Can you share the best exercises to do after 40?

ST: Firstly, it’s important to know any exercise is better than no exercise. Being over 40 doesn’t mean that you need to stop exercising because you are scared of physical injury or damage to the heart. With age, certain exercises should be adjusted for your current abilities, not what you could do in the past. Training session frequency should also be amended.  For your body to benefit from the time you spend in the gym or on the road cycling, you will have to add some intensity. Long slow distances will do very little for your body and will more than likely break down your already depleting muscle mass. There is also no reason to spend hours in the gym or doing any other exercises.  As we grow older we lose muscle strength and mass; that’s a given. It becomes harder to build the muscle we so desperately need for our bodies to function but it can be done – that’s great news for all of us.

Find exercise ideas here: The Best Way To Burn Fat & Lose Weight – Advice From A Trainer

Q: How often should you exercise at 40 and over?

ST: This will vary from person to person as each person has a different biological makeup and DNA. DNA testing is a great way of determining how your body reacts to any form of exercise and will tell you how to plan your training, but more importantly, how you rest. As a broad and very general formula, I assign two days for training and one day for rest. When you get a bit more conditioned to your chosen form of exercise, increase workout sessions to three days of training and one day of rest. The intensity and duration of training sessions will also play a major part in how you rest between training sessions. You will have to rest to give your body time to recover and for your muscle to repair itself and grow – that’s non-negotiable.

Q: Should you add or remove any foods and beverages from your diet?

ST: Again this will vary from person to person.  Funnily enough, your DNA will give you a great idea of what and what not to eat. Some can eat carbohydrates while others should eat more protein. It’s best to strive for a balanced diet. I eat all foods but I do limit my fat intake. I love carbs, but I try to eat those during the daytime or after a hard training session, even if done late in the afternoon. Our bodies need the fuel to repair and to fully operate, so the worst thing we can do is to not eat anything. Please don’t do that!

Q: Are supplements necessary for good nutrition after 40?

ST: For sure! As we grow older there are great legal supplements we can and must use that will help us recover faster and for us to convert our hard work during training into small gains. Supplements are often frowned upon and have an unjust steroid stigma. However, these are two separate things. There are major differences between supplements and steroids, so it’s wise to learn about them so you aren’t confused and living with misinformation.

Q: Can you share some fitness recovery tips with us?

ST: Good sleep, nutrition and managing stress levels sit right at the base of your general and overall well-being. You get that right and you are 80% there. It will make your training so much easier and more effective.

If you’re feeling motivated to start working out right now, visit the Medshield Movement Resource Hub for a range of free exercises, recipes for nutritious eating and how to #LiveAssured with Medshield.

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The Best Yoga Poses for Weight Loss

The practise of yoga has many poses. Some of these are designed to increase body and joint flexibility and strength, while others may help to trim, tone and burn fat – essentially, helping with weight loss. But yoga can help with weight loss in other ways too.

Yoga, as a form of exercise, comes in many styles. Some of these practises are geared more towards weight loss than others, such as Hot26 (Bikram), Power Yoga, Ashtanga and Vinyasa. However, long-term, consistent practise of gentler styles, such as Hatha, will lead to strengthening, toning, greater flexibility and weight loss.

Yoga teaches a sense of self-awareness and mindfulness that may then extend into how people behave outside of the yoga studio. This could lead to more mindful-eating habits as well as an improved approach to living life in a healthier way. Yoga also helps to improve sleep and alleviate stress and anxiety, which, can otherwise, lead to emotional eating for some.

Yoga can be started at any age. In addition to stress-relief and body mindfulness, here are some postures that focus specifically on creating strong, lean muscles and burning fat. Practise these four moves below each day – it won’t take more than 10 minutes.

Chaturanga Dandasana

This pose is also known as the Four-Limbed Staff pose, also known as Low Plank. We practise lowering ourselves down into Chaturanga during transitions in Vinyasa, Ashtanga and Power Yoga. This pose is often followed by Upward Facing Dog and then Downward Facing Dog.
From a high plank, with your elbows tucked into your side, exhale as you slower lower yourself down into a low plank. Hold for five breaths.

 

Downward-Facing Dog

This pose, aka Adho Mukha Svanasana, tones your whole body by paying a little extra attention to arms, thighs, hamstrings and your back. Holding this pose and concentrating on your breathing engages your muscles and tones them, as well as improves your concentration and blood circulation.
From high-plank pose, lift your hips upwards toward the ceiling and create a triangle-like shape with your body. Bring your chest closer towards your thighs. It doesn’t matter if your ankles can’t touch the floor, but stretch them towards the floor. Bend your knees a little if need be. Hold for 10 to 20 breaths. Use a mirror to help you check your posture.

 

High Crescent Lunge

From Downward Facing Dog, exhale and step your right foot forward between your hands, aligning your knee over the heel. Keep your left leg strong and firm.

Inhale and raise your torso upright. At the same time, sweep your arms wide to the sides and raise them overhead, palms facing. Don’t arch your back – keep your torso strong. Hold for five to 10 breaths and then move back into Downward Facing Dog before repeating the same on the other side.

Advanced: With your right leg forward, rotate your ribs to the right until your left elbow hooks on the outside of your right thigh. Bring your hands together in a prayer position, breathe into the back of your ribs, and twist above your navel to rotate. Hold for five to 10 breaths and then gently come back into the lunge before proceeding as indicated above.

 

Chair Pose

Also called Utkatasana, this pose powerfully strengthens the muscles of the arms and legs, and stimulates the diaphragm and heart. It is also  called a “fierce seat” and can really burn.

From standing position, inhale and raise your arms over your head so that your biceps are just slightly in front of your ears. Exhale and bend your knees so that your thighs are as parallel to the floor as possible. Keep your inner thighs parallel to each other and sit your hips back, like sitting into a chair. You should be able to see your toes. Hold this pose for five to 10 breaths.

 

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10 Tips to Make You a Better Runner

If you’re looking to improve your running performance, no matter if you’re a beginner or experienced, these tips can help to improve your abilities.

New to running? Read these tips!

 

  1. Warm up

 

Before heading into a training session or participating in a foot race, it’s important to warm up your muscles and joints. Consider a 500m to 1km jog as warm-up before running a race. Read here for 6 warm-up moves for runners.

 

  1. Do speedwork
    Interval sessions and sprints help to boost power and increase speed overall.
  2. Cross-train
    Sports like cycling can help to boost cardio and endurance while remaining low-impact, so it’s easy on your joints.
  3. Include strength work

Body weight strength training, including moves like push-ups, planks, lunges, squats and pull-ups can really help to improve your running.

  1. Run hills

Some of the beauties of running hills are improved strength and endurance. Hill-training improves leg-muscle strength, quickens your stride and expands stride length.

  1. Fuel and refuel properly
    Much of our running performance is connected to the kitchen. Our bodies are all slightly different and thus you need to figure out what suits you. In general, you need to fuel appropriately with carbohydrates and recover with protein (20g after an hour or more of intense exercise).
  2. Stay hydrated
    Being dehydrated can severely impact a runner’s performance. It’s important to hydrate adequately for two to three days in the build-up to a big running race or training session.

 

  1. Prioritise your sleep

Getting the required amount of good-quality sleep can really improve your running – particularly endurance – and your ability to recover. Adults need between seven and nine hours of good-quality sleep per night.

  1. Stretch
    It’s important to stretch after a training session to prevent injury and to keep your muscles supple. Read this: Quick, Beginner-Friendly Yoga Stretching For Runners
  2. Work on your stride
    It’s possible that your stride may need some correcting and focus. Often a running coach can help improve this, but if you’re struggling with injuries, it’s best to see a physiotherapist.

    Read more: How To Start Running – Advice from a Physiotherapist

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Running VS Cycling – which is better?

While a lot of people might consider themselves a runner, the world seems to be more strictly divided into cyclists and non-cyclists. But if you’ve ever thought about trying either sport, there are so many great health benefits to both. Here we take a look at the pros and cons of each.

Duathlons exist for a reason. Yes there are people who like to both run and ride and then there are even those who like to throw swimming in the mix and call themselves triathletes! Just ask one of our ambassadors, Amy Hopkins, who always dabbled in running, but in 2017 decided to get her first bicycle and give cycling a try. She avidly loves both sports and believes they complement each other.

Running Pros

  • Running is a time-efficient way to get good cardio in. For example, you can get a good run in, in 30 minutes and do this five times a week to get fitter.
  • Running burns fat and muscle, which means it helps to tone and is a good sport for weight-loss.
  • You don’t need much gear for running – really just a pair of running shoes (and a good sports bra, if you’re a woman).

Running Cons

  • Running can be “hard” on the body as it has a lot of impact on joints. If you’re a beginner, you may injure yourself easily. Long-distance runners also struggle with many injuries later on in life, linked to their hips and knees.
  • Running doesn’t seem to have a high barrier to entry, but it’s very hard on the body for someone who is overweight or unfit. It feels painful and very uncomfortable in the beginning.
  • While a pair of running shoes is not a lot of gear to invest in (compared to cycling), wearing the wrong ones can lead to a lot of injuries, so you need to spend time figuring out what shoes are right for your feet.

Cycling Pros

  • Cycling is an excellent form of cardio exercise.
  • Cycling is low-impact – compared to running – so it’s much easier on your joints.
  • A person with any level of fitness or weight can jump on a bicycle or gym bike and get a workout in without the level of pain or difficulty that comes with running.
  • Cycling can really take you places, so you can cycle for an hour and end up in a different town for coffee, which adds to its appeal.

Cycling Cons

  • Speaking of heading to different towns, cycling is much more time-consuming than running. And to get a good ride in, you often need two to three hours (unless of course you’re on a gym bike, which is different, because you’re working constantly).
  • Cycling is perceived to be more dangerous because bike jacking and bike theft is a real problem in South Africa. Some of our roads are also not deemed as safe – South Africa has a high rate of car accidents and drunk driving, which is a big cause of concern for cyclists. Cycling in a group is therefore much safer, whereas you can more easily go running alone through a park or along a boardwalk, depending on the area. That said, runners who run on the road are also vulnerable to cars.
  • Cycling is expensive. At least a lot more expensive than running. So the barrier to entry here is less about fitness, but about resources. However, this doesn’t mean that you can’t hop on a gym bike for “exercise”.
  • If your bicycle setup is not right, this can also cause injuries.

The result?

It really depends on your lifestyle, but both are excellent forms of exercise. And you should warm-up and stretch adequately after each of the sports to prevent injuries.

Coach Steve Atwell recommends doing both. “Cross-training allows for the use of different muscles. If all you do is run, you’re much more likely to get injured than if you do multiple sports.” Cycling really helps build endurance, but isn’t as hard on the body as running, so you can go for longer and recover faster, which means that cycling does in fact help your running!

 

 

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Why You Should Add Cycling To Your Weekly Workouts

Cycling used to be known as the sport for MAMILs – Middle-Aged Men In Lycra – but it has grown immensely as a sport in South Africa, particularly in the women’s market, and is now one of the trendiest sports around, with multiple events and races all year round. Here, we showcase the health benefits and explore why it’s such a great form of exercise.

First off, “cycling” is an umbrella term for a few different cycling activities, think: road cycling, mountain biking, gravel biking, indoor training (Spinning, Peloton, Soul Cycle) and there are even more niche forms such as BMX, enduro and cyclo-cross. For the purposes of this article, we will look at cycling in the mainstream.

Let’s get back to those MAMILs: cycling, as a sport, has often been recommended to those who need to do lower-impact exercise, due to injuries or health concerns and, even, ageing. Because cycling is a great form of cardio that is less hard on the body than other cardio exercises, such as running, it’s in fact physically easier to do.

To be fit and healthy you need to be physically active. At least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity per week – ideally 300 minutes, as per the WHO guidelines.

Regular physical activity can help protect you from serious diseases such as obesity, heart disease, cancer, mental illness, diabetes and arthritis. Cycling is a healthy, low-impact exercise that can be enjoyed by people of all ages, from young children to older adults. It is also fun, can be used as a mode of transport and is good for the environment. An estimated one-billion people ride bicycles every day – for transport, recreation and sport.

 

Why You Should Cycle

  1. You can cycle at multiple levels of intensity. If you’re still building fitness or coming back from an injury, start with low-intensity sessions. This can be done in the gym or out on the road or trails.
  2. Because the sport is low-impact, you are less likely to get injured and will recover faster in between sessions.
  3. Cycling uses the major muscle groups and is thus a good form of exercise.
  4. Cycling increases stamina, strength and aerobic fitness. It’s also a great way to build endurance and complements other sports, such as running.
  5. It’s easy! It does not require a high level of skill (until you actually start competing) and once you know how to do it, you never forget. With the introduction of e-bikes, now most people can ride together, no matter your fitness level.

Other benefits of regular cycling include: improved joint mobility; decrease in stress levels, anxiety and depression; stronger bones; decrease in body fat and a general prevention or management of other lifestyle diseases.

 

 

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Home Workout Moves To Strengthen Your Lower Back

Many people struggle with lower back pain, often caused by sitting for long periods hunched over at a desk and weak muscles. There are a few easy moves to incorporate into your weekly routine to help improve posture and reduce injury.

The lower back is actually part of the core and building core strength can help to prevent injury as well as create better overall posture and back health. These moves specifically help to strengthen the lower back area.

Move 1: Bridge

Start by lying on your back on the floor, bend your knees and place the soles of your feet flat on the ground, hip-width apart directly under the knees. Allow the palms of the hands to rest on the floor beside the torso. Lift the hips and lower back off the mat, pressing into the soles of the feet. Continue to lift the upper back and chest, roll the shoulders under, lifting onto the back of the shoulders, protecting the neck. Breathe in this pose holding for up to 20 seconds. Exhale and release down by moving the shoulders and rolling the spine down onto the mat from the shoulders to the hips. Repeat this up to 5 times and then hug your knees gently towards the chest and rock from side to side.

Move 2: Cobra

Start by lying on your stomach, place your hands under your shoulders drawing the elbows close in towards the body. Inhale and slowly press into your hands, lengthening the arms, drawing the chest up. Do not extend your arms fully if you feel pressure in the lower back. Draw the shoulders back.Ensure you are feeling the back muscles working rather than just the arms.
Hold for 10 seconds and lower back down gently. Repeat 3 times.
If you’re a beginner, start by holding Baby Cobra, just by lifting your chest up off the mat, keeping your arms bent at the elbow.

Full Cobra
Baby Cobra

Move 3: Locust

Start by lying on your stomach. Sweep your arms so that they are extended out in front of you. Firm your butt and lift your head off the mat followed by your chest, arms and finally lifting the legs. Lengthen and stretch through the toes. Working with the breath, continue to raise your arms encouraging the shoulders and chest to lift further off the mat. Keep the head neutral, chin down to allow for length through the spine into the neck. Breath here for 15 seconds and release with an exhalation. Repeat up to 5 times.
Stretching the arms out in front of you means an added arm workout. Make the move easier by sweeping the arms back or even by alternating sweeping arms backwards.

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Five moves to build strong arms without weights

Want to get stronger arms, but you don’t have access to weights or a gym? We’ll show you how with these five moves. Each move has options for beginners and more advanced fitness levels.

Do 10 reps of each move and then three sets overall, taking a short break in between sets to catch your breath. Add this to any workout or get it done after your runs or walks 3 times a week.

Move 1: Push-Up

A push-up is one of the best body-weight workout moves as it targets more than your arms and back, but also your core.
If you’re a beginner, start by doing these on your knees. Slowly progress to being able to do 10 full push-ups. Make sure that you keep your body in a straight line and lower down to the mat until your body is parallel. Do these slowly and with intention (it will burn more). Do 10.

Move 2: Triceps Dip

Tricep dips work the muscles in the upper arm, specifically the triceps, and are one of the best exercises for toning the arms.
Find a bench or even a large log in a park. Face away from the bench, placing your hands on the bench behind you. If you’re a beginner, bend your knees, otherwise keep them straight out in front of you. Press into your palms to lift your body and slide forward just far enough that your bum clears the edge of the bench. Lower yourself until your elbows are bent between 45 and 90 degrees. Push yourself back up slowly until your arms are almost straight and repeat 10 times.

Move 3: Reverse Plank into Crab Crawl

You’ll need a bit of space for this move. Crab walking will help you burn fat and tone your back, arms, shoulders, core, legs and even hamstrings!
If you’re a beginner, hold a reverse plank for 10 seconds to complete one rep, lower yourself down to rest between reps. Do 10.
If you’re more advanced, start from a reverse plank move and then bend your knees up to the ceiling to form a crab. Move forward by advancing your opposite hand and foot simultaneously, alternating sides. Move four paces forward and then four paces backwards. This is one rep. Repeat 10 times.

Move 4: Walking Plank

This not only builds great arm strength, but is great for building a strong core!
Start by getting into a forearm plank position. Start by pressing into your right palm and straightening your right arm, followed by your left. Lower your right forearm back down, followed by your left, so that you’re back into a fore-arm plank. Do 5 starting with the right side and then 5 starting with the left side. Keep your hips square and core engaged.
If you’re a beginner, place your knees on the ground like an assisted push-up.

Move 5: Inch Worm

To activate the shoulder, arms, and core, start standing, then exhale into forward fold and place your palms on the floor. Walk your hands out one at a time until you arrive in a high plank position. Then walk your feet forward one at a time to meet your hands. That’s one rep.
Bend your knees to make it easier.
If you’re a beginner, stand in front of a chair, bend forward and place your hands on the front edge of a sturdy chair or couch. Walk your hands from the front to the back, rear of the seat and back again.

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