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Sustainable Living for South African Families

Sustainable Living for South African Families

In your household, sustainability should be more than just a buzzword; it’s a necessary commitment to ensure a healthier planet for future generations. South African families, with their deep-rooted connection to the land’s natural beauty, have a unique opportunity to lead the way in adopting sustainable living practices. 

Understanding Sustainability

Sustainability involves making choices that meet our current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet theirs. For your family, this means considering how everyday actions affect the local environment, from the bustling streets of Johannesburg to the serene landscapes of the Western Cape.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

A fundamental principle of sustainable living is the “three Rs”: reduce, reuse, and recycle. You can start by reducing waste. Simple actions like avoiding single-use plastics, opting for reusable shopping bags, and minimising food waste can have a significant impact. It is important that when cleaning up, we are making recycling a part of that effort and are teaching our children what can be put in the normal bin vs the recycling bin.

Water Conservation

Water is a precious resource in South Africa, with regions like the Eastern Cape and Western Cape often facing drought conditions. Families can conserve water by fixing leaks, using water-efficient appliances, and collecting rainwater for garden use. It is also important that we are teaching our kids to shower instead of bath, and to turn the tap off when they are brushing their teeth. We can also engage our children in gardening activities like planting indigenous plants and watering the garden sparingly. Activities like this will stimulate their minds and draw the connection between taking care of their surroundings and a flourishing environment. They will especially love a spade and some dirt! 

Energy Efficiency

With South Africa’s energy sector heavily reliant on coal, reducing energy consumption at home can significantly decrease carbon emissions. Families can invest in energy-efficient appliances, switch to LED lighting, and consider solar panels to harness the abundant sunshine. Teaching the family to turn off a light or a fan when you leave the room is an easy but effective way to save on electricity and teach them about conserving energy. You could also get them a solar-powered phone or tablet charger to teach them about solar. The South African government offers incentives for renewable energy installations, making this a financially viable option for many households.

Supporting Local

Buying locally produced goods not only supports the South African economy but also reduces the carbon emissions associated with long-distance transportation. Families can visit local farmers’ markets, choose South African-made products, and support local artisans, fostering a community-focused approach to sustainability.

Sustainable living for South African families is not just about the choices we make today; it’s also about educating our children to be environmentally conscious citizens. South African families can encourage sustainable habits through activities like recycling projects, nature walks, and participating in community clean-up events, instilling a sense of responsibility and love for the environment.

 

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DISCLAIMER: The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended as medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This article may contain information related to exercise, fitness, diet, and nutrition, which is intended solely for your personal use and informational purposes. Before commencing any exercise, fitness, diet, or nutrition regimen, especially if you are pregnant or have pre-existing health conditions, you should consult with a physician. Nothing on this site should be construed as medical advice or diagnosis. For any symptoms or health concerns, please consult a healthcare professional.
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Why should your child practice yoga?

In our fast paced world, where our senses are constantly being bombarded and the expectation to over achieve is high, yoga can really help one calm down, pause and breathe. We at Yogi BearsZA believe giving this tool of reflection and introspection, the tool to connect, mind, body and breath will really aid in all life decisions children will need to make.

Yoga is the greatest tool to add to any child’s toolbox for life.

Let us explore the benefits in more:

  • Physical: Promotes balance, coordination, strength and flexibility. Includes breathing techniques to improve self-awareness and self-control.
  • Emotional: Boosts self-esteem and confidence. Provides a non-competitive and non-judgmental space for children to interact. Reduces stress and anxiety
  • Social: Facilitates social interaction between children. Including appropriate social and coping skills through the use of themes. Promotes respect for self, for others, for the world.
  • Mental: Addresses focus and attention. Teaches mindfulness as well as strengthens mind-body connection.
  • Other: Balances energy (high or low), inspires more play, creativeness and promotes connectedness with self and others.

Yoga is not like other extra murals and here is why:

As already eluded, children are living lives that are busier than ever. They wake up and immediately get ready for 6 hours (or more) of school. Their day is packed with academic work, physical education, play on the playground and when the school day is done, an extra mural or two.  Then there is homework that needs to be done and we are already at dinner, bed and bath  without much quality time with the family or themselves. There are a few special things that yoga brings to a child’s life that sets it apart from other forms of sport or exercise let us just expand on 3:

  1. Yoga is not competitive. The emphasis is not on winning in a yoga class but working as a team or working to the best of your ability. The aim of yoga is for children (or adults) to become more in tune with themselves and their bodies, their strengths and their weaknesses.
  2. Yoga incorporates themes to facilitate esteem and social skills. Let’s look at the theme of a flower or tree. By incorporating yoga postures around this theme and using words such as “grow, flourish and expand”, we facilitate confidence and self-esteem. It incorporates social skills, “my flower is different, it may be smaller, a different size or colour, but we are all beautiful”.
  3. Yoga focuses on breathing. Teaching children how to breathe in a yoga class will help them to use these tools when they are angry, anxious, upset or sad in different situations. Breathing becomes their super power and they feel more empowered to self-regulate in difficult times.

Yoga for kids is a wholesome fun filled practice that ticks the physical, emotional, and social development in children. It is a tool that can be used anywhere at any time and for these reasons we at Yogi BearsZA believe Yoga for Kids is one of the greatest gifts you could ever give your child.

Cami Barausse.
Founder of Yogi BearsZA- Yoga for Kids.

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My baby has eczema, what do I do?

Help! My baby has eczema – now what?

Many infants and small children develop skin irritations, including rashes and eczema. Here’s how to identify if it’s eczema and the best ways to treat it.

 Is it definitely eczema?

Here’s a list of symptoms to look out for:

  1. Is your baby’s skin dry and itchy? Your baby may consistently scratch or rub the affected areas.
  2. Is your baby’s skin red and inflamed? The skin affected by eczema may appear red, inflamed or irritated.
  3. Is your baby developing rashes? Eczema can cause red or brownish-gray patches of skin, and these patches may develop small, raised bumps that may ooze or crust over.
  4. Are the skin irritations commonly appearing in these places: on the face, especially the cheeks and chin, as well as on the hands, wrists, elbows and behind the knees?

How do I treat this with home remedies?

If you suspect that your baby has eczema based on the above, here are some things that you can do immediately to alleviate the symptoms.

  1. Avoid using harsh soaps, detergents or creams that may exacerbate the condition. Choose hypoallergenic and fragrance-free skincare products specifically designed for babies with sensitive skin.
  2. Regularly apply a hypoallergenic, fragrance-free moisturiser to keep your baby’s skin hydrated. Moisturizing is crucial in managing eczema and preventing flare-ups.
  3. Dress your baby in soft, breathable fabrics. Avoid wool or synthetic materials that may irritate sensitive skin.
  4. Keep your baby’s nails short to prevent scratching, as scratching can worsen eczema and lead to infections. Consider using mittens or clothing with fold-over cuffs to protect the skin.
  5. In dry climates, consider using a humidifier in your baby’s room to maintain appropriate moisture levels.

When do I need to go to a doctor?

If your baby’s symptoms persist, get worse and you start to notice swelling or oozing fluids, it’s advisable to seek expert medical attention. Take note of the following symptoms:

– If your baby is experiencing significant discomfort, sleep disturbances or distress due to eczema, consult with your GP for guidance and medication to assist with managing these issues.

– If you notice signs of infection, such as increased redness, warmth, swelling or the presence of pus, consult a doctor immediately.

– If you suspect that certain foods, environmental factors or substances may be triggering or worsening eczema, it may be time to consider allergy testing.

______
DISCLAIMER: The information provided on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended as medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This article may contain information related to exercise, fitness, diet, and nutrition, which is intended solely for your personal use and informational purposes. Before commencing any exercise, fitness, diet, or nutrition regimen, especially if you are pregnant or have pre-existing health conditions, you should consult with a physician. Nothing on this site should be construed as medical advice or diagnosis. For any symptoms or health concerns, please consult a healthcare professional.
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5 Signs Your Child Might Be Diabetic

Worried your little one or teen might be diabetic? Here are five signs to look out for.

While Type-1 Diabetes (which cannot be prevented) is more commonly found in children, numbers of children developing Type-2 diabetes are on the rise. Type-1 occurs when the body cannot produce insulin, leading to high blood-sugar levels. Type-2 which is a lifestyle disease, largely due to obesity and sedentary lifestyles, is becoming more prevalent in children. In Type-2, the body doesn’t use insulin properly, leading to insulin resistance.

If you suspect that your child may have diabetes, contact your doctor ASAP for a proper evaluation.

Here are five signs to look out for that could potentially indicate diabetes in children.

1. Frequent urination – in children this may include bed wetting.

  1. Excessive thirst – if your child drinks more than usual and complains of being thirsty it may be a cause for concern.
  2. Extreme hunger – despite eating a “normal” or even an increased amount of food, children with diabetes may experience intense hunger.
  3. Unexplained or sudden weight loss – if your child loses weight for no apparent reason, this could also be a cause for concern.
  4. Fatigue and irritability – persistent fatigue and irritability could indicate that the body is not effectively using glucose for energy and thus your child could experience mood swings and tiredness.

Any of these symptoms could be indicative of other underlying health conditions, so it’s important to keep track over a period of time. Always check with your medical doctor and ask for a blood test to confirm.

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Medshield Mom | Postpartum Depression

While many regard the birth of a baby as one of the happiest occasions in a couple’s life, the sad reality is that it can be a very dark time for many women who experience postpartum depression (also referred to as peripartum depression or major depressive disorder with peripartum onset). It’s believed that postpartum depression affects one in seven women, yet few speak about due to fear of being judged and misunderstood.

The official term, ‘peripartum depression’ recognizes that signs of depression are often present even before delivery. Women experience hormonal, physical and emotional changes during and shortly after pregnancy. While most women experience the ‘baby blues’ after childbirth (changes in mood due to hormonal changes, inadequate sleep and adjusting to a new baby), this passes in a week or two after delivery. The effects of postpartum depression are more significant and persistent.

Symptoms of peripartum depression:

  • depressed mood
  • sleep disturbances (insomnia or hypersomnia)
  • tearfulness
  • anhedonia (loss of pleasure in activities previously enjoyed)
  • feelings of guilt
  • fatigue or loss of energy
  • appetite changes (no appetite or comfort eating)
  • thoughts of death or suicide (in severe cases)

Postpartum depression is very difficult for women to talk about, for the fear of being judged. Society often tells us what a blessing it is to have a baby and that one should be grateful. While such comments might be true, they often prevent new mums from sharing their struggles for the fear of invalidation. This leads to many new mums suffering in silence. There is sadly still a stigma associated with postpartum depression, leaving many new mums lonely and unsupported.

Risk Factors

Some of the risk factors for postpartum depression include a history of depression or anxiety, premenstrual syndrome, high risk or complicated pregnancies, traumatic birthing experience, marital conflict and a lack of psychosocial support.

Treatment

If you suspect that you may have postpartum depression or are struggling to adjust to the birth of your newborn, speak to your gynaecologist or GP. They will refer you to a psychologist, psychiatrist, or both. If these symptoms occur during pregnancy, see a psychologist immediately so the symptoms may be treated to prevent further stress during the pregnancy.

Treatment options are psychotherapy, specifically cognitive behavioural therapy and supportive psychotherapy, couples therapy (as a supportive partner can greatly help improve symptoms through the support they provide) and in some cases, medication. Many new mums may be resistant to the idea of medication during pregnancy or breastfeeding. In severe cases, where symptoms are impacting on the mum’s daily functioning, a psychiatrist can prescribe medication that is considered to be safe in pregnancy. Mums who are breastfeeding may discuss the pros and cons as well as safe treatment options with a psychiatrist.

Supporting a Loved One

If you’re a partner or family member of someone who is pregnant or has just delivered, educate yourself on the signs and symptoms of postpartum depression, so you can facilitate professional help-seeking. Provide emotional support through regular check-ins about how they are feeling, what they are struggling with the most and how you can support them better. Encourage rest and try to alleviate the new mum of some responsibilities so she has time for little self care activities. Assist with finding a suitable professional and help facilitate an appointment, if necessary. Help by normalizing their experience and assuring them of your support.

The key to effective recovery is seeking help as soon as symptoms are recognized. Effective treatment not only manages the depressive symptoms, but plays a significant role in the mother-infant bond and the development of the baby.

by Rakhi Beekrum, counselling psychologist.

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Medshield Mom | Gentle Parenting: Empowering Children with Compassion and Respect

In recent years, there has been a significant shift in parenting styles, with gentle parenting gaining traction as a prevailing trend. As parents strive to raise emotionally healthy and confident children, the principles of gentle parenting have garnered attention for their focus on empathy, communication, and understanding. In this article, we will explore what gentle parenting is, why it has become a prominent trend, and discuss some of the pros and cons associated with this nurturing approach to raising children.

Understanding Gentle Parenting

Gentle parenting is a parenting philosophy that centres on building a strong, supportive bond between parent and child. At its core, gentle parenting revolves around treating children with respect, compassion, and understanding rather than relying on traditional authoritarian or punitive methods. It emphasises the belief that children should be guided with love and empathy, encouraging them to learn from their experiences and emotions.

Unlike more traditional parenting approaches, gentle parenting aims to avoid punitive discipline methods such as spanking or yelling, instead opting for non-violent communication and problem-solving techniques. It promotes active listening, validating children’s feelings, and engaging them in open, honest conversations, thus fostering a deeper level of trust and emotional connection.

The Rise of Gentle Parenting

The rise of gentle parenting can be attributed to several factors. First and foremost, society’s overall approach to child-rearing has evolved over time. As research and knowledge about child development continue to expand, parents are increasingly looking for more effective and compassionate ways to raise their children.

Additionally, the advent of social media and access to information has facilitated the sharing of parenting experiences and techniques. This interconnectedness has allowed the gentle parenting movement to spread rapidly, connecting like-minded parents seeking alternative methods of discipline and guidance for their children.

Furthermore, the long-term impact of traditional punitive parenting methods has come under scrutiny. Studies have shown that harsh disciplinary techniques can lead to negative emotional and psychological consequences for children, impacting their self-esteem and overall well-being. In contrast, gentle parenting has gained popularity as an alternative approach that aims to empower children and foster healthier relationships within the family dynamic.

The Pros of Gentle Parenting

  1. Strong Parent-Child Bond: Gentle parenting places a significant emphasis on building a strong emotional bond between parents and their children. This nurturing connection can lead to a more secure attachment, promoting emotional well-being in children as they grow and develop.

  2. Positive Discipline: By focusing on non-punitive discipline methods, gentle parenting helps children develop better emotional regulation and problem-solving skills. They learn from their mistakes and develop a sense of responsibility for their actions.

  3. Encourages Independence: Gentle parenting encourages children to think independently and make decisions, fostering a sense of autonomy and self-confidence.

  4. Emphasis on Empathy: By empathising with their children’s feelings and needs, parents practising gentle parenting model emotional intelligence, teaching children how to express themselves and understand others better.

 

The Cons of Gentle Parenting:

  1. Time-Intensive: Gentle parenting requires a considerable investment of time and patience. It involves frequent communication, active listening, and understanding, which can be challenging for busy parents.

  2. Lack of Clarity: Critics argue that gentle parenting’s non-punitive approach might lead to a lack of clear boundaries and consequences for children’s behaviour, potentially hindering their understanding of appropriate conduct.

  3. Cultural and Social Challenges: Gentle parenting may face resistance in societies or communities where more traditional authoritarian parenting styles are deeply ingrained. Ultimately, you can only do what feels right for you and your family and try not to be concerned about what everyone else thinks.

  4. Potential Misunderstanding: The gentle parenting approach can sometimes be misinterpreted, leading to the misconception that it permits permissiveness or lack of parental authority.

 

In conclusion, gentle parenting is a contemporary parenting style that is gaining popularity due to its focus on building strong emotional bonds and fostering healthy communication between parents and children. As a response to the drawbacks of punitive parenting methods, gentle parenting promotes empathy, positive discipline, and child empowerment. While it may not be without its challenges, the growing appeal of this nurturing approach suggests that many parents are finding it to be a promising path towards raising emotionally resilient and confident children. As with any parenting style, it’s essential for parents to find what works best for their unique family dynamics and their child’s individual needs.



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Best Foods For Breastfeeding Moms

What Should Breastfeeding Moms Eat?

Breastfeeding and being a new mom is a lot of work – your body is healing, you’re hardly sleeping and, now, you’re responsible for an infant. And as mom is passing on highly nutritious and calorie-dense food to her baby, she too needs to make sure that she is adequately fuelled. Here are the best foods for breast-feeding moms to include in their diet.

  1. Eat more protein
    Breast milk contains high levels of protein to help your baby grow and it’s important that during breastfeeding, that moms increase their level of protein intake. It’s advised to have healthy protein at each meal. Include oats or eggs at breakfast, add in lean meats and oily fish (trout, salmon, mackerel) and plant-based protein such as legumes and beans.
  2. Eat more
    You may need to include an additional 300 to 500 calories in your diet while breastfeeding. It’s important to consult your doctor about this as each body is different.
  3. Up your vitamins and minerals
    While breastfeeding it’s important to make sure that moms have adequate amounts of vitamin A (sweet potatoes, carrots, dark leafy greens, eggs), D (mushrooms, eggs, oily fish) and E (avocado, broccoli, peppers, almonds) and well as B12 (shellfish, liver, yogurt, oily fish, nutritional yeast, eggs) selenium (brazil nuts, seafood, whole grains and seeds) and zinc (oysters, red meat, poultry, beans, nuts, dairy). Consult with a dietician to make sure that your eating plan contains all the necessary nutrients or alternatively the appropriate supplements, as discussed with your doctor.
  4. Drink more water
    When breastfeeding you may feel thirstier. Remember that “mature” breast milk (click here to read about the different breast-milk stages) contains 90% water, so it’s important that new moms stay well hydrated.

For a tailor-made diet plan that suits your lifestyle and requirements, consult with a dietician or your medical doctor.

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The Three Stages of Breastfeeding And Tips For Success

Wanting to fall pregnant or the first baby is on its way? Here’s what to know about the different stages of breastfeeding, what to expect and tips for successful breastfeeding.

According to the American Pregnancy Association, In the first two weeks after a baby is born, breast milk progresses through three main stages: colostrum, transitional breast milk, and mature breast milk.

Breastfeeding stage 1: Colostrum

The Colostrum stage is the first type of breast milk and this is already present towards the end of your pregnancy and during the first few days after the baby is born. The low volume of colostrum can range between white and milky to sticky and yellowish. It contains all the nutrients your newborn needs: high in protein, white blood cells and antibodies. It’s also a natural laxative for your baby and helps to prevent jaundice.

 Breastfeeding stage 2: Transitional Milk

Transitional Milk is the next type of milk produced by your body and this stage lasts up to two weeks. This milk is a combination of Colostrum and Mature Milk and is higher in calories than Colostrum. This milk includes high levels of fat, lactose and water-soluble vitamins. Your breasts may become fuller and warmer and your milk slowly changes to a bluish-white color.

Breastfeeding stage 3: Mature Milk

This stage can start as early as 10 days after giving birth, but usually begins around two weeks post birth. About 90% of this milk is water, which is important for keeping your infant appropriately hydrated. The remaining 10% is carbs, protein and fats – all the macronutrients needed for growth and energy.

A 2018 study published in the journal “Nutrients” revealed that: in the milk of mothers breastfeeding for longer than 18 months, fat and protein increased and carbohydrates decreased significantly, compared with milk expressed by women breastfeeding up to 12 months. This shows again how the breast milk nutrient levels change – this time to accommodate what a toddler may need.

Tips for Successful Breastfeeding

– Cuddle your baby on your chest .Holding your baby skin-to-skin will help your body to start making milk and will wake up your baby’s feeding reflexes.

– Look out for movements such as: your baby turning its head “looking for food”, licking lips or putting their hands or mouth. Crying is a late cue and your baby may need to be calmed down first in order for successful breastfeeding to happen.

– It’s important for mom to sit or lie down comfortably and to relax shoulders.

– Express milk by hand: a few drops of milk on your nipple will help to get your baby’s attention to start feeding.

– When holding your baby, place their nose to your nipple until your baby’s mouth opens as big as a yawn to take a mouthful of your breast. You will feel your baby suckling gently at first, and then stronger with a rhythm of one or two sucks per swallow, and little pauses to rest.

 

Contact your doctor for further information and any medical advice you may need for your own breastfeeding plan.

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The Health Benefits of Breastfeeding Your Baby

World Breast-Feeding Week 1-7 August. |

Here we mention the health benefits of breastfeeding your baby and why it’s good for mom too!

The aim of World Breastfeeding Week is to help raise awareness about the health benefits of breastfeeding for both baby and mom.

Did you know that breast milk is the best source of nutrition for most babies? According to the CDC (Centre for Disease Control and Prevention), as your baby grows, your breast milk will change to meet your baby’s nutritional needs.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for 12 months or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.

The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action encourages breastfeeding as a way to ensure food security and nutrition for infants up to two years old. They also state that it contributes to improved health and wellness for mothers. Let’s look at what some of the most crucial health benefits are.

In the journal “Breastfeeding and Maternal and Infant Health Outcomes in Developed Countrie”, the following results were published:

Babies who were breastfed for longer than six months showed a:

63% reduced risk for upper respiratory tract infections

Babies who were breastfed for at least 3 months showed a:

40% reduced risk of getting asthma

– Between 30 and 40% reduced risk of dermatitis

30% less risk of inflammatory bowel disease

30% less risk of Type 1 Diabetes.

And that any breastfeeding at all has the chance of lowering your child’s risk of obesity by 24% and Type 2 Diabetes.

The WHO says that Breast milk provides all the energy and nutrients that the infant needs for the first months of life, and it continues to provide up to half or more of a child’s nutritional needs during the second half of the first year, and up to one third during the second year of life.

It also says that studies have shown that Breastfed children perform better on intelligence tests, are less likely to be overweight or obese and less prone to diabetes later in life. Women who breastfeed also have a reduced risk of breast and ovarian cancers.

For more information about breastfeeding health benefits and best practice or assistance, contact your doctor.

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Medshield Mom | Mom Guilt

You are a mother; not a martyr!

If you grew up with a mother or around mother figures who were self-sacrificing, always putting others first and who seemed able to do it all, it makes sense that you might struggle with mom guilt.

Mom guilt is the irrational belief that you are not a good-enough mother, despite doing your absolute best under the circumstances. While guilt can be healthy when it motivates us to act in accordance with our values, irrational guilt can lead to low self worth, depression and anxiety.

What causes mom guilt?

  • Mom guilt may occur as a result of postpartum depression (but is not an indicator that one has postpartum depression).
  • Existing anxiety disorders – mums who are anxious are more likely to worry that they are not a good enough mum.
  • Societal pressures play a significant role in mom guilt. This includes messages from our own family and friends about how we should parent, comparing ourselves to other mums, social media’s portrayal of mums who seem to do it all so effortlessly (while looking glam), mums at school who seem to be doing so much more than us and social media posts that are constantly telling us about what is best for our child.
  • Working mums (who are actually working to give their children a better life) often struggle with not spending enough time with their children, not having enough energy at the end of a busy day and missing events in their child’s life (such as sports).
  • Over-identifying with the role of mother can also play a role in mom guilt. While being a mom might be one of the most special roles in your life, you are more than just a mom.

We don’t talk about enough about mom guilt for some of the following reasons:

  • Constant reminders of what a blessing it is to be a mum
  • Being reminded that our mums did it without complaining
  • Social media mostly portrays the fun and glamorous aspects of parenting
  • We feel that sharing our difficulties means that we don’t love our kids
  • We feel that we’re the only one whose struggling
  • We compare ourselves unfairly to moms who (outwardly) seem to have it all together.

You are only human! The mental load of motherhood is exhausting, because there is a lot to juggle (including the mental labor of planning so that everything can go as smoothly as possible).

If this is something you struggle with, here are some important reminders:

  • Stop comparing yourself to others mums because (a) you don’t know what goes on behind the scenes; and (b) you don’t know what their load is and what resources they have available.
  • Being a good mom does not mean doing more or spending more time with your child. A good mom is a present mom. What matters most is the quality of time you spend with your child.
  • In order to be a good mom, you have to fill your own cup. You are not being selfish by taking care of your physical and mental health needs. Children need parents who are present and emotionally regulated. Your stress levels have an impact on your child -so take care of you!
  • Recognise who you have in your village. How can you share the load? What resources can you call on? What can you outsource or delegate?
  • Be mindful of your own self talk and remind yourself that you are trying your best.
  • Know who you can turn to for reassurance – fellow mums or a mom blogger, whose posts resonate.
  • Trust that you are doing your best.

Your child does not need a perfect mom – your child needs a present and mindful mom.

– Rakhi Beekrum | Psychologist, motivational speaker and mental health advocate 

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The Health Benefits of Breastfeeding Your Baby

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My baby has eczema, what do I do?

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Preparing your home for a new born

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Oral health during pregnancy

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Best Foods For Breastfeeding Moms

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