My child has asthma, what do I do now? - Medshield Movement

My child has asthma, what do I do now?

You’ve just found out that your child has asthma. Now what? We’re here to help guide our Medshield moms in the right direction.

World Asthma Day is on 2 May and to help create more awareness and understanding around asthma, we’ve put together this quick helpful guide for moms. It is, of course, important that you discuss all health-related questions with your medical doctor. Your doctor will be able to create a tailor-made health-care plan for your child, depending on the severity of their asthma.

What exactly is asthma?
There are different kinds and levels of severity.
Think of it this way: Airways carry air to the lungs. Airways get smaller and smaller like branches of a tree. When asthma is under control, the airways are clear and air flows easily in and out. When asthma is not under control, the walls of the airways in the lungs are always thick and swollen. During an attack, the sides of the airways get even more swollen. The airways get squeezed. The airways make more mucus than normal.

Asthma action plan

  1. You cannot cure asthma, but you can control it.
    Children – and adults – can lead normal lives when their asthma is under control. This includes going to school, playing and sleeping well.
  2. Be on the lookout for signs of an asthma attack
    Your child may occasionally have trouble breathing and experience asthma attacks. Look out for signs such as wheezing, coughing or a tightness in their chest. Your child may wake up in the night from an asthma attack.
  3. Know what to do if an attack occurs.
    This includes: knowing how to use an inhaler accurately and always having one on hand / on your child’s person. You can ask your doctor for a written-out asthma action plan to follow if you’re feeling panicked.
  4. Avoid triggers
    Figure out if your child has any asthma triggers – perhaps pollen, pet allergies, dust etc.
  5. Go for regular check-ups – at least once a year, or as prescribed by a doctor. Keep a record of behaviour, so that you can tell if the asthma is worsening.

For more information, visit the Global Initiative for Asthma.

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